Company

Two Japanese scientists and a Japanese-American have won the 2014 Nobel Prize for Physics for inventing a new energy-efficient light source, the blue light-emitting diode (LED).

“With the advent of LED lamps we now have more long lasting and more efficient alternatives to older light sources,” the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said in its Nobel citation.

Isamu Akasaki, 85, and Hiroshi Amano, 54, of Nagoya University and Shuji Nakamura, 60, ofthe University of California, Santa Barbara, share the $1.1m prize.

The three men were the first to produce bright blue light from semiconductors, triggering “afundamental transformation of lighting technology”. Red and green LEDs had been known fordecades but previous attempts to make blue LEDs had failed.

The laureates’ research in Japan in the early 1990s solved the problem – and opened a huge new market for LED lighting because white light can be produced by adding blue to green and red.

Send your message to us:

INQUIRY NOW
  • * CAPTCHA: Please select the Flag


Post time: Sep-22-2017